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New York City is home to the largest Chinese population outside of Asia, and more Chinese-Americans and Chinese immigrants live in Queens than any other borough. Now, a new Queens Library partnership with the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) will help us preserve the stories, traditions, and cultural contributions of the Chinese community in New York and share them with the rest of the city.

As part of this project, Living Memory: The Culture and Heritage of Chinese New Yorkers, Queens Library and MOCA will hold a series of programs through October 2016 where members of the Chinese community can tell their stories and have them preserved digitally for library and museum archives while sharing Chinese art, crafts, music, movies, and more with their fellow New Yorkers.

Living Memory: The Culture and Heritage of Chinese New Yorkers is supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the National Endowment of the Humanities. 

To get updates on upcoming Living Memory programs, Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter

All Flushing Programs

Flushing Community LIbrary
41-17 Main Street
718-661-1200

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Memories of Migration Digitization Session
Friday, September 23
2pm

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Share your migration stories and get your family photos digitized for free! The Queens Memory Team will scan your photographs, postcards and other memorabilia and save them to a thumb drive that you can take home. Bring your family photographs, and expect to learn something new about your neighborhood! 3rd Floor, IRC Conference Room.

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The Dong Chorus and the Current Situation with Chinese Rock Music
Sunday, October 2

1:30pm

Speaker: WU Hongfei, Researcher of The Dong Chorus, Writer, Vocalist of rock band Happy Avenue

Topics:

  • Music gives us freedom and hope.
  • The current situation of the Dong Chorus as the world 'intangible cultural heritage' of the world.
  • The decadence of Chinese folk music.
  • The mimicry and bionic characters of China’s Rock Music.

Auditorium.

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Golden Spike 

Monday, October 24
1pm

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Speaker: Dr. Shen Jianhong

The author a historical work, Golden Spike, will talk about US Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads and stories of Chinese builders, as well as other workers.  The railroad was a powerful element to the economic development and population migration of both eastern and western coasts.

Dr. Shen Jianhong, a historian from Shanghai has been studied this particular history since 2001. She published her studies in Golden Spike and will share her findings of lost stories with audience. Auditorium.

Programs In Other Locations

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YA Graphic Novel Club: "American Born Chinese"

Written and Illustrated by Gene Luen Yang
Monday, September 12

5pm

Join us for a discussion of "American Born Chinese" by Gene Luen Yang. Award winner in 2007 for Best New Graphic Album, this novel contains three stories about acceptance. One story is about the Monkey King who is trying to claim his place among the gods. Another focuses on a boy named Jin who is trying to fit in while being bullied by his classmates and dealing with his crush on a classmate. The third story is about Danny, a popular boy who is embarassed by his naive Chinese cousin Chin-Kee.

Poppenhusen
121-23 14 Avenue
College Point, NY 11356
718-359-1102

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Photo Credits (In Top Collage Area):

  • A man in a mask and a lion dancer are performing together during a Lunar (Chinese) New Year celebration on Bayard Street. Photograph taken by Kitty Katz, Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) Collection.
  • Len family portrait taken in Stratford, Connecticut, 1925. Courtesy of Edwin K. Len, Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) Collection.
  • Boy from Boy Scout Troop 150 saluting. Photograph taken by Sonnee Gottlieb, Courtesy of Kenneth & Helen Chan, Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) Collection.
  • A woman with a Taiwanese flag on her hat is holding a baton in a Chinese New Year parade. She is being followed by a marching band. Courtesy of Marylin Chou, Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) Collection.
  • A Beijing opera performer, Huang Zhengqing, dressed as the Monkey King at the China Institute in New York City (125 E 65th Street). Photograph taken by Kitty Katz, Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) Collection.
  • Family portrait of Ting Jue Ho (Father), Kam Hung Ho (Mother), and Cheuk Ping Ho and Cheuk Sum Ho in 1934. This was Ting Jue’s 2nd time in the US. Courtesy of Cheuk Ping Ho, Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) Collection.